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BPW London April 2009 Newsletter- Making a Difference Our Way

In This Issue:

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Feature Article: Kathryn Munn, Board of Directors, W.O.R.K. Appointment

President's MessageLet Us Build Together...Young BPW Event ReportNot For Sale: Anti-Trafficking Event ReportOntario Volunteer Award WinnersReport on Commission of the Status of Women - United NationsLondon Abused Women's Centre Event ReportTax Planning for a Family with a Special Needs ChildBPW Ontario NewsBPW Canada NewsSafe Respectful and Inclusive Workplace ConferenceWomen's Community House Presents Grand House Party VIIPeople for Sale in Canada Conference Executive Meeting Minutes Notices & EventsUpcoming BPW Events

 


Kathryn Munn, Board of Directors of W.O.R.K. Appointment by Doris E. Hall, International Chair

 

On behalf of the BPW London Executive Committee I am delighted to inform you of Kathryn Munn’s appointment to the Board of Directors of W.O.R.K. (Women Offering Resources and Knowledge). This is the charitable entity for BPW Canada.

The objectives of W.O.R.K. are:

  • to develop, fund, promote and carry on activities and programs for the advancement of education and personal development of women in Canada through the creation and provision of programs, curriculum and courses in leadership, life skills and professional development;
  • to develop, fund, promote and carry on activities, programs and facilities to provide women in Canada with leadership abilities and skills by advancing their education and knowledge through collaborative interaction and open dialogue with and ongoing mentoring from women who are community leaders involved in public service, government or business, in ways the law regards as charitable.

Kathryn will join four other directors from across Canada with the mandate to make decisions on investing and disbursing funds from BPW Canada’s charitable trust. With her great knowledge of working with boards and her excellent negotiating skills, she will be a tremendous asset to this board.

On behalf of all of us, please accept our congratulations, Kathryn!

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President's Message by Carole Orchard

As we reflect on the press about the downturn in the world’s economy it brings home that fact that many in our London community and beyond are facing hardships that are likely to increase the number of those in our lower-socio-economic bracket in our society. Prior to this downturn our provincial government chose to tackle poverty under the leadership of London MPP Deb Matthews. Perhaps it is time for us to ask ourselves how too can we engage in helping our city reduce poverty. Although it probably seems an overwhelming task we may be able to find key niches that relate to BPW goals and at the same time be manageable in moving resolutions forward.

You will recall in November, our guest speaker,Lynne Livingston,discussed the ambitious plan that London has developed in reducing the inequalities that exist in our own city. In researching the role of the provincial government I found that since 2000 they have set forward an agenda to decrease poverty rates in the province. And in 2008 under the leadership of Deb Matthews, consultations were held and a plan has been put in place.

To help position our understanding of the issues, I found a brief submitted in January, 2003 by Barata & Hughes on behalf of Campaign 2000 – End Child Poverty in Canada to the Ontario Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs. In this brief they provide clarity around key areas that if addressed have a strong likelihood of meeting the planned goal. For us, I have identifiedthree areas that directly affect women: (1) minimum wage rates; (2) claw backs to Canada Child Health Benefits; and (3) child care. Click here to read the complete details of the three areas.

There are certainly others but these three seem to be key to lobbying on which we may wish to focus. Although there are many other areas that can assist in resolving poverty the above three appear to most directly affect women, our mandate. If we, as a club, are committed to assisting both Deb Matthews and the London group focusing in the same area. we will need to focus on one or two issues that have the most significance in helping to overcome the issues that force women and their children into a continuance of poverty. I hope at our April Resolutions Meeting you will begin to discuss what we, as a club, might do to assist in supporting those marginalized in our society who are living in poverty and those advocating for ending child poverty in our city.

Click here to read Carole's complete article.

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Let Us Build Together....BPWL's Young BPW Event - by Megan Popovic, Young BPW V.P.

Lena Madeson Phillips, founder and first president of BPW International, wrote in 1930: “Let us build together and see what we can make.” From the preparatory planning meetings, to executive committee discussions, to the establishment of the first Young BPW event of 2009, Lena’s vision became our guiding theme and foundation of confidence. Leading up to the planned event on March 25th, we sought to work together to co-create a fresh foundation of London Young BPW.

We believe that our kick-off evening was a tremendous success and we can proudly state that 100% of all guests that evening have signed on to become members of our club. The night began with a gathering circle where all women introduced themselves and our Young BPW representative read the poem, Everywoman. This led into a description of BPW International, Canada, and London and the four cornerstones of our organization, at which time the women learned about the opportunities that exist by joining such a socially-active, collaborative, and influential organization. These opportunities were then brought to life when several current Young BPW and BPW members shared their personal stories about how BPW has invigorated and informed their lives - from travels to the United Nations to attend the Commission on the Status of Women to the powerful networking opportunities within BPW to lasting friendships within BPW London. A particular highlight of the evening was the discussion that ensued after these stories around such powerful questions as: What do young women want in terms of community in London? What components of BPW appeal to current and future needs of young professional women today? What might future Young BPW events look like in the upcoming year and how do we attract women to our club? This collaborative conversation was brought to life by the knowing that we have the power to co-create our future! Ideas swirled and excitement built around the potential for establishing a 2009-2010 program that infuses hope, social awareness and activism, and connection into all monthly events.

A message to current BPW London members: Going forward, we of Young BPW need your help!! The current Young BPW members will be meeting in April to determine a plan of action and draft a program for the next several months. When events are planned, please pass along the posters and information to organizations, teams, groups, and individual women who may be interested. We seek to cultivate Young BPW and your assistance is essential for this growth to occur.

A special thank you to Doris Hall for mentoring me and her sharing her life-wisdom and BPW insights to facilitate the building of Young BPW London. Thanks to Linda Davis and Sheila Crook for volunteering their time to support our March gathering and providing beneficial feedback. Finally, a note of gratitude to Laura Noble for her constant kind words of encouragement, links to key national and international Young BPW members, and help with constructing the key information networks to make this endeavor a success.

Our next Young BPW event will be this June!! Please contact Megan Popovic for details: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Let’s keep the momentum going and see what we can build!

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Not For Sale....London Anti-Trafficking Event Report by Doris Hall, Mary McBrearty and Helen Lomax

Professor David Batstone, sponsored by the Anti-Trafficking Group in London, spoke to an audience of approximately 50 people at King’s College on Sunday evening about his experience and investigations into human trafficking or human slavery. He prefers to use the term “involuntary servitude”. In his book Not For Sale, he describes situations and specific people who have been forced into sexual service and forced labour in various countries, as well as child soldiers, and some brave individuals who have launched a rescue program. He advised that if one wishes to be an activist, be a “smart activist” and talks about how to do that.

He also gave many suggestions for how individuals can help to combat involuntary servitude without putting themselves in danger. Some of his suggestions are:

  1. Challenge the university to do research on human trafficking in Canada and partner with the University of San Francisco to create a global network and support.
  2. Gather information from a safe distance about suspicious activities where individuals may be held captive and forced to work against their will, taking photos and documenting activities. If sufficient information is gathered, it can be passed over to police for further investigation. A Centre for Investigation is needed with trained investigators before launching an activity such as this. Dr. Batstone will conduct a training session in San Francisco this summer for those interested, to equip them with tools and techniques.
  3. Be a conscious consumer! Investigate where and how items you purchase are made. Visit the website http://www.free2work.orgwhere you will find information about companies that do not use forced labour and companies that do. You can also do a search on companies to find out how their product is produced. You can report a company that you find is using forced labour, and companies have the opportunity to become a “free2work company”. Through this method, Proctor & Gamble is now a “free2work company”. Another industry that he mentioned specifically is the chocolate industry. Seventy percent of chocolate is produced from cocoa beans from Africa processed by slave labour. The website for the chocolate industry is http://www.freechocolate.org.
  4. Dr. Batstone brought products that were produced by a group of “free2work” individuals. There is also a business opportunity for entrepreneurs to set up a franchise retail store selling only “free2work” products.
  5. An awareness project he building is to map places in the U.S. and Canada where slavery has been found. His investigators have reported evidence of slave activities, which are posted on the website http://www.slaverymap.ca. Locations in Canada that were reported are in Brampton, Toronto and Mississauga. If enough information is gathered in Canada, we will be able to pressure our government to tighten the laws in the country.
  6. According to Marty VanDoren, retired RCMP officer who was hired to educate law enforcement officers and the public about involuntary servitude, most of the incidents in Canada are sexual in nature and police are frustrated by the lack of strong laws to support their efforts to combat the trade.

Dr. Batstone has also published Saving the Corporate Soul”. Other books of interest are: Bitter Roots, Tender Shoots, and Veiled Threat by Sally Armstrong, The Natashas by Victor Malerek.

Anyone interested in joining the Anti-Trafficking Group in London, they meet on the 3rd Thursday of every month at the Salvation Army Centre for Hope.Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.for further information.

Conference - People for Sale in Canada? Human Trafficking Community Awareness Day - May 19, 2009, click here for details.

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Congratulations - BPW London Recipients of Ontario Volunteer Awards by Carole Orchard, President

I am delighted to inform you that our club application for an Ontario Volunteer Award for all of you has been accepted. The Ceremony will be held on Friday, April 17th at 7:30 pm in the Marconi Club at 120 Clarke Road in London. Each of will be presented with a lapel pin and certification in recognition of their commitment and dedication as a volunteer in Ontario. I will be delighted to be present to honour all from BPW London. Each of will be receiving an invitation to the award ceremony. Thank you so much for taking the time to provide us with your volunteering information. It was truly amazing to realize the contributions that each of you have made. This ceremony will be an opportunity to recognize you and your role with our club!

Recipients are: Norma Yau, Sandy Pearce, Doris Hall, Eva Main, Sheila Crook and Susan Dill.

 

volunteers

 

Congratulations to all of you!

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Report on Commission on the Status of Women meetings at United Nations
53rd Session in New York, 2009 by Doris Hall 1st Vice President, BPW Canada

Kathryn Munn and I were fortunate enough to attend the first week of meetings for the Commission on the Status of Women at the United Nations in New York this year. We arrived in time for opening day; however, because of long lineups to get our security pass, we missed the opening. It was a cold morning one-hour wait, first thing Monday outside the UN in icy slush and wind, but we made it through without a glitch. This year's theme is "Equal sharing of responsibilities between women and men, including caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS." A sub-theme is "Women and the Global Financial Crisis."

Out of over 2000 NGOs, BPW had a good presence of members worldwide. We met with our International executive and supported the two workshops co-sponsored by BPW, one on Equal Pay Day and the other on Gender Budgeting. The Equal Pay Day Awareness Campaign was structured to encourage every country to stage an Equal Pay Day and garner support for it countrywide. Based on women receiving 68% of the wages paid to a man, calculate how many months in the year that you have to work to obtain an equal pay day. Sue Calhoun and I even protested the budget of the Canadian government in front of the UN.

In the Gender Budgeting workshop, the panel pointed out the benefits of everyone equal and why it makes no sense to do otherwise. If government budgets treated women and men equally, there would be more tax income, fewer people on welfare and in subsidized retirement homes, and children would have more advantages, to name a few. It was stated that on average, a woman will lose approximately one-half a million dollars in income over her lifetime.

The Government of Australia and its Human Rights Commission presented An Amazing Story and Film about how two women lead a change in a remote Aboriginal community which was being destroyed by alcoholism. The two women told how they got all the women in the community together and came up with a plan for change. Their plan worked to get the men back to work, the children back in school and drastically reduced the abuse of women and children and reduced the incidents of rape in the community. It was a great success story that showed how women can lead a community for positive results.

I also attended a seminar sponsored by the Finnish Federation of University Women She Says NO to Violence, featuring keynote speech on Trafficking of Women in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). Other speakers were from the UN, Division of Advancement of Women, Minister of Culture and Sport responsible for Gender Equality, World YWCA and the National Committee for UNIFEM in Finland. This seminar highlighted the devastation caused by human trafficking around the world and why it is so important for everyone to take steps to combat it now.

For further details and photos, please check the BPW Canada website and read the President’s blog. She has lots of detailed information for you.

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London Abused Women's Centre 9th Annual International Women's Day Breakfast & Auction Report by Doris Hall, International Chair and Laura Noble, Public Relations Chair

We attended the International Women’s Day Breakfast and Auction for the London Abused Women’s Centre. We were pleased to see London Business and Professional Women’s Club listed as one of the “Friend Sponsors”. The room was filled to capacity with men and women, approximating 1,000 in total. The speaker Lia Grimanis, who rode her pink BMW motorcycle from Toronto to London the night before in temperatures below zero, shared her story about Building a Life from Nothing, being an abused child and how she survived on the streets of Toronto. She is now a successful business woman who is the founder of Up With Women an organization dedicated to helping homeless women and children to rebuild their lives. There were over 100 donations in the silent auction, as well as ticket sale items, door prizes and a live auction.

It was a terrific event and we highly endorse supporting it in the future, both as a sponsor and as attendees.

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Tax Planning tips for the Family of a Special Need’s Child…what you need to know… by Rose Kuchynski, CGA, CFP, TEP

A lot of people may walk away from claiming all of the tax credits they could be entitled to because initiating the process can be complicated and time consuming. This may also be at the time when they are overwhelmed with all of the issues surrounding their child’s initial diagnosis of Autism/Aspergers. The good news is that you can apply for tax credits back to the year you were originally entitled to them!

The first step is to obtain the disability tax credit certificate (DTCC) using Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) formT2201. This is the “trigger” for the ability to claim enhanced tax credits and benefits, certain medical expenses, and to participate in the new Registered Disability Savings Plan.

The DTCC should be completed by a medical practitioner who can certify all sections of the form applicable to your situation, although individual therapists may also certify in specific areas. You may want to do some “coaching” regarding completion of the form. You will want the medical practitioner to certify that there is “severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions” and the effect or cumulative effect will meet the definition of “markedly restricted in the basic activities of daily living”. Each section should state the year when the restriction began. This is sometimes a grey area because even though you may want it indicated as birth, the practitioner may only show the year the diagnosis was made.

The completed certificate indicating the Autism Spectrum Disorder is filed with CRA, who reviews it and decides on your entitlements. If you receive less than the number of years’ of tax credits you had requested or if they disallow your claim, you can and should challenge the assessment in writing.

Ensure all identification and tax credits applied for are complete. A letter can either accompany an adjustment (T1ADJ) request or be done on its own, asking prior years’ review and reassessment to the timing indicated on the DTCC. Some families have received up to ten years’ in tax credits, providing substantial refunds. CRA is only required by tax law to go back to three prior taxation years, however administratively they have allowed up to ten years. Our opinion on the best approach is “nothing ventured, nothing gained” so you should request as much as you can.

Maximum amounts (rounded $) on which tax credits apply in Ontario for special needs taxpayers and dependents are briefly summarized in the complete version of this article. You should consult a tax professional or do your own research via CRA’s website and publications to ensure that you have obtained the maximum entitlements and are aware of restrictions and income related reductions. Tax credits work differently than tax deductions and are either refundable or non-refundable. Non-refundable credits reduce the amount of tax you owe and can result in a refund of tax amounts paid. Refundable credits give you a rebate whether or not you have tax payable or paid.

Medical Expenses listed in the complete version of this article may be claimed by the lower income person to maximize the credit available. For a complete list showing eligibility requirements, please refer to CRA publication IT519R2.

Also available is the Refundable Medical Expense Supplement (up to $500 for lower income persons), and effective July 1, 2008, the Child Disability Benefit, which supplements the parents’ Canada Child Tax benefit up to $2,400 per child with a DTCC.

GST & PST relief is also available for most healthcare services, personal care and supervision programs used when the primary caregiver is working.

For more information, please contact our office Johnston & Company Professional Corporation or visit our website at www.johnstonandco.ca.

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BPW Ontario News - Through Their Eyes: The Women of Niagara

The Niagara Historical Museum is hostingan exciting Exhibition and lecture Series entitled "Through Their Eyes" which celebrates the women of Niagara. Hope is to gain the support of women who are: part of women's associations, business owners or just have a keen interest in uniting for this unique event.


The museum is asking forthat the Business & professionals Women's Clubs of Ontario, might be interested in becoming sponsors to the event, or simply come out and show support.


The Exhibition runs from April 1-September 30, 2009.


For further information contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.905.468.3912 or vist the web site.


BPW Canada News - National WebSecure Page &AGM

Note: Any attachments mentioned in the Club Mailings can be obtained in the Members Only Section of the BPWC web site. If you do not know your login, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Safe Respectful and Inclusive WorkplacesConference- May 28 and May 29, 2009

Hosted by the Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women and Children

Four Plenary Panels and twenty-four workshops offer an immersion in issues related to workplace discrimination, harassment, bullying & violence. Presenters will share expertise on law, policies and practices. Themes include: standards and strategies for creating and maintaining safe and respectful workplaces; personal & institutional costs of workplace violence; corporate best practice; labour’s responsibility and involvement in creating a safe and respectful workplaces; addressing workplace violence as an occupational health and safety issue; and human rights in the workplace.

DINNER & KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Anita Hill

In 1991, Anita Hill was thrust into the public spotlight when she testified about sexual harassment before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the Supreme Court confirmation hearing of Clarence Thomas.

The conference will appeal to a wide range of stakeholders: labour, management, community advocates, academics, legislators, policy experts, woman abuse experts, human resource professionals, health and safety specialists, trainers, consultants, equity officers, and individuals who have experienced unsafe, disrespectful, exclusionary workplaces.

Registration

Early Registration (until April 30, 2009): $350

Registration (after April 30, 2009): $425

Student Registration: $300

Anita Hill presentation and dinner only: $125

Inquiries to Eric Magni This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or www.CRVAWC.caor click here for flyer.

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Women's Community House Presents...Grand House Party VII - June 19, 2009
Pet Sounds of the '60's featuring the songs of The Beach Boys. June 19, 2009 9 8:00 p.m. Grand Theatre, London, ON. Tickets $45.

Staring Jean Meilleur and members of the Jeans 'n Classics Band. Presented by Women's Community House and RBC Royal Bank.
Door Prizes, 50/50 Draws.

Tickets available at the Grand Theatre Box Office or 519.672.8800. Click here for more details/flyer.

People for Sale in Canada - Human Trafficking Community Awareness Day - May 19, 2009.

Hosted by The Salvation Army Ontario Great Lakes Division. This gathering will help service providers to understand Human Trafficking in their local context, provide tools to identify victims and generate an integrated community response to assist those trafficked.

Best Western Lamplighter - Registration 8:30 a.m. - Conference 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. May 19.

Registration Fee: $75.

Guests Speakers: Victor Malarek, Constable Kris Arnold and Matty Van Doren.

Click here for more details/flyer.

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Executive Meeting Minutes

Below is a summary of the March 2009 London Executive Minutes. At the end ofthe summary there is a link to the complete version of the minutes.

Business Arising

  • The previous year's annual reports are ready and will be added to the May 2009 newsletter.
  • Helen Lomax reviewed a letter and petition form Joy Smith, MP Kildonan - St. Paul. Petition is for Smith's members' bill on Human Trafficking. Helen will discuss and distribute at March dinner meeting.
  • Doris Hall and Megan Popovic met regarding the March 25, 2009 Young BPW event. Doris is also speaking at a continuing education class about BPW and the UN and will invite the class to the Young BPW event.
  • Linda Davis has updated the by-law section pertaining to the new guest price policy. Laura Noble has added the updated by-laws to the London web site.

Dinner Meeting

  • New Members Winnifred Barnett and Nancy Kirwin will be inducted.
  • Kathyrn Munn and Doris Hall will provide a report on their visit to the UN.
  • Carole will discuss the Nominations for executive.

Reports

  • Treasurer: Budget 2009 - 2010, with revisions was passed and will be presented at the April meeting.
  • Membership: 29 members.
  • Public Relations: Laura Noble has set up a Facebook group for BPWL. Laura has also setup an email address for Young BPWL: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
  • Resolutions: Carole Orchard mentioned two areas of possible deveopment for resolutions: Research on Type 2 diabetes as it relates to pregnant women and the nursing shortage.
  • District/Provincial: Reimburesment of delegates and alternates to the Provincial Conference will be completed after the Conference.
  • National: Laura Noble will be London's delegate at the National AGM. Sheila Crook and Linda Davis have begun work on the 2012 National Convention. The BPWC's now has a member's only page.

Complete March 2009 Minutes

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Notices & Events

  • Recession-proof yourself: Fundamentals of Mediation at Munn Conflict Resolution Services (owned by Kathryn Munn, BPWL member)

    Learning how to mediate is an asset whether you are exploring a career option related to mediation services or whether you are developing skills for your current job. In addition to positions specifically for mediators, job roles such as human resources, management, and customer service all benefit from the application of mediation skills.

    This spring is your opportunity to get the mediation training you want in beautiful downtown London, Ontario.

    Fundamentals of Mediation is an intensive 40 hour course approved by the ADR Institute of Ontario and completion of the course qualifies for application as a mediator member of the ADR Institute of Ontario. The 5 days of the course are May 11, 12, 13, 25, 26, 2009.

    See www.munncrs.comfor more information.

As a BPWL Member, if your business has an upcoming event or notice, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for inclusion in the next newsletter by the last day of the month. It's FREE and great way to promote your business' workshops, upcoming events etc.

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Upcoming BPW Events

  • BPW London: May 19, 2009 - Human Trafficking: Modern Day Slavery in Canada! Speaker: Sister Sue Wilson, The Sisters of St. Joseph

  • BPW Ontario 63rd Annual Conference: Step Up! - May 29 - May 31, 2009.
    All members are invited to the annual Ontario Conference in 2009, to be held in Sault Ste. Marie.

    Click to download registration form.

    Click here for more info.

  • BPW London: June 13, 2009 - Planning Meeting: Be a part of the planning of the 2009-2010 BPWL season. Planning Meeting is June 13, 2009 from 10 a.m. - Noon at the London Police Station. RSVP:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  • BPW London: June 16, 2009 - Gourmet BBQ: Our last get together until September....6:00 p.m. at the home of Carole Orchard. Note: in some previous communications,the date was displayed incorrectly as June 17.

  • BPW Canada National AGM June 20, 2009, Toronto, Ontario. All members are invited. Click here to download registration forms etc or read more about the AGM on the BPW Canada web site.

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Newsletter submissions deadline is the last day of the month. Submissions are to be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Monthly BPWL's newletters are usually posted mid-month. Click to read past newsletters.


BPW London is a member of the Canadian Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs

Member of The Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ontario


 

Lena Madesin Phillips

"Let us build together and see what we can make."

Lena Madesin Phillips, founder and first President of BPW International, 1930

Bridges ...

BPW London's

Bridges Out of Poverty One-Day Workshop

Click here to read about the success of the day!

BPW London on Facebook

BPWL Meetings

Partnering Through the Community: BPW London 2013-2014 Program


BPWL dinner meetings are 3rd Tuesday of the month: Sept - June

Reserve your spot:
reservations@bpwlondon.com

Click here for complete program.

BPWL Community Involvement

Click here to learn about BPW London's Community Involvement